Poetry Appreciation

date
Nov 20, 2022
slug
poetry-appreciation
status
Published
tags
Poetry
Chinese
summary
A love for classical Chinese poetry
type
Post

兩句三年得,一吟雙淚流

Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Translated as: Two verses is conceived three years to come, a read up on the double tears flow.
Translated as: Two verses is conceived three years to come, a read up on the double tears flow.
😼 This audio file can help you practice your pronunciation

✨ Introduction

From the poem "題(tí)詩(shī)後(hòu)" by Jia Dao of the Tang Dynasty

😎 People

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The portrait is beautified by AI after the original photo processing
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Jia Dao (traditional Chinese: 賈島; simplified Chinese: 贾岛; pinyinJiǎ DǎoWade–GilesChia Tao) (779–843), courtesy name Langxian (浪仙), was a Chinese Buddhist monk and poet active during the Tang dynasty,A native of Fangyang (present-day Zhuozhou City, Hebei Province)

🎓 Explanation

It took me three years to come up with these two verses, and once I read them I couldn't help but shed two lines of hot tears.

🎉 Appreciation

This line reflects the poet Jia Dao's perfection in refining words and phrases and his painstaking efforts in laying out his poem.
Commentary 吟(yín): to read, to recite.

為人性僻耽佳句,語不驚人死不休

Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Translated as:
Translated as:
a. I have a penchant to indulge in good poetry verses.
b. As a person I’m one-sided by nature, addicted to lovely lines,
a. Until I can find lines that knock you off your feet, I won't stop.
b. if my words don’t startle others, in death I will not quit.
😼 This audio file can help you practice your pronunciation

✨ Introduction

From Du Fu's "Short Narrative: Surging River Resembles Raging Ocean" in the Tang Dynasty

😎 People

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Du Fu (ChineseWade–GilesTu Fu; 712–770) was a Chinese poet and politician of the Tang dynasty. Along with his elder contemporary and friend Li Bai (Li Po), he is frequently called the greatest of the Chinese poets.[1] His greatest ambition was to serve his country as a successful civil servant, but he proved unable to make the necessary accommodations. His life, like the whole country, was devastated by the An Lushan Rebellion of 755, and his last 15 years were a time of almost constant unrest.
Although initially he was little-known to other writers, his works came to be hugely influential in both Chinese and Japanese literary culture. Of his poetic writing, nearly fifteen hundred poems have been preserved over the ages.[1] He has been called the "Poet-Historian" and the "Poet-Sage" by Chinese critics, while the range of his work has allowed him to be introduced to Western readers as "the Chinese VirgilHoraceOvidShakespeareMiltonBurnsWordsworthBérangerHugo or Baudelaire".

🎓 Explanation

The human nature is eccentric and only indulges in beautiful poetry, and if the poetry does not move the heart, I will not rest until I die.

🎉 Appreciation

This line shows the poet's good intention to "聊(liáo)短(duǎn)述(shù)", his perfect poetic skills, his serious writing attitude, and his heart-stopping aesthetic effect.

紅杏枝頭春意鬧

Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Translated as: On the apricot blossoms, the spirit of spring has burst forth a glorious sight.
Translated as: On the apricot blossoms, the spirit of spring has burst forth a glorious sight.
😼 This audio file can help you practice your pronunciation

😎 People

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The portrait is beautified by AI after the original photo processing
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Song Qi (Chinese: 宋祁; 998–1061), courtesy name Zijing (子京), was a Chinese essayist, Anlu (now in Hubei), migrated to Kaifeng Yongqiu (now in Qixian County, Henan).historian, politician, and poet of the Northern Song dynasty.
The line "red apricots" is dedicated to apricot blossoms, using the blossoms to set off the intensity of spring. The lyricist uses a personification technique and the word "haunting" to portray the beautiful spring light vividly and vividly.
The last line of the first piece finally brings out the perfect song "the spirit of spring has burst forth a glorious sight.". If this line is the finishing touch to the picture, it is more like a flowering of emotions in the lyricist's heart. The word "鬧(nào)" not only describes the many and varied red apricots, but also brings out the vibrant and beautiful spring light. The word "鬧(nào)" not only has a color, but also seems to have a sound, as Wang Guowei said in his "Words of the World": "With a '鬧(nào)' word, the whole realm comes out.”

一看腸一斷,好去莫回頭

Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Translated as:
Translated as:
A backward glance, a broken heart --
Go, be at ease, don't turn your head.
😼 This audio file can help you practice your pronunciation

✨ Introduction

From "Parting at South Pool" by Bai Juyi of the Tang Dynasty

😎 People

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Bai Juyi (also Bo Juyi or Po Chü-iChinese: 白居易; 772–846), courtesy name Letian (樂天), was a renowned Chinese poet and Tang dynasty government official. Many of his poems concern his career or observations made about everyday life, including as governor of three different provinces. He achieved fame as a writer of verse in a low-key, near vernacular style that was popular throughout China, in Korea and Japan.[1]
Bai was also influential in the historical development of Japanese literature, where he is better known by the on'yomi reading of his courtesy name, Haku Rakuten (shinjitai: 白楽天).[2] His younger brother Bai Xingjian was a short story writer.
Among his most famous works are the long narrative poems "Chang hen ge" ("Song of Everlasting Sorrow"), which tells the story of Yang Guifei, and "Pipa xing" ("Song of the Pipa").

🎓 Explanation

Look back once on the liver, rest assured to go forward and do not look back.

🎉 Appreciation

This line is written with great affection and sentiment, showing the thousand kinds of sorrow and love in the heart of the departed, which can hardly be expressed in words.
Commentary 好(hǎo qǜ)去: feel free to go ahead. 莫 Mo: don't.

誰憐一片影,相失萬重雲?

Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Translated as: Who remember one now shadow,Mutual lose myriad layer cloud
Translated as: Who remember one now shadow,Mutual lose myriad layer cloud
😼 This audio file can help you practice your pronunciation

✨ Introduction

From "The Solitary Goose" by Du Fu of the Tang Dynasty
Note 萬(wàn)重(chóng)雲(yún): It refers to the high sky and the long road, and the sea of clouds is diffuse.

🎉 Appreciation

In the opening line, "Who remember one now shadow,Mutual lose myriad layer cloud?" The realm is suddenly broadened. In the vast and distant sky, this little lonely goose is only a "piece of shadow", and it is lost in the "layer cloud" with the flock of geese, looking anxious, anxious and confused at this moment. The contrast between "a piece" and "layer cloud" constitutes a great contrast and speaks highly of its "孤(alone)". The word "Who remember" expresses the poet's pity for the lonely geese. The poet's pity for the lonely geese is expressed in the couplet. In this couplet, the poet and the geese are asked the question "Who remember", and "things and I are blended together". The poet misses not only his brother, but also his close friends. After the An-Shi Rebellion, the poet was in exile in those turbulent years, and his friends and family were separated and on different sides of the world.

泉聲咽危石,日色冷青松

Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Translated as:
Translated as:
Spring water strikes sobbing precipitous rocks.
Sunlight looks chilly casting onto green pines.
😼 This audio file can help you practice your pronunciation

✨ Introduction

From Wang Wei's "Passing Xiangji Temple" in the Tang Dynasty

😎 People

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The portrait is beautified by AI after the original photo processing
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Wang Wei (Chinese: 王維; 699–759[1]) was a Chinese poet, musician, painter, and politician of the middle Tang dynasty. He is regarded as one of the most famous men of arts and letters of his era. Many of his poems survive and 29 of them are included in the 18th-century anthology Three Hundred Tang Poems.
Wang Wei is especially known as a poet and painter of nature. Some 400 poems survive. These were first collected and originally edited into a corpus by his next-youngest brother, Wang Jin, by imperial command. Of his paintings, no authenticated specimens survive, although there is evidence of his work through influences on later paintings and descriptive accounts of his paintings. His musical talents were regarded very highly, although nothing survives of his music except reports. He furthermore had a successful career as a court official. Eventually, he became a devout Zen Buddhist and a vegetarian.[2] Wang Wei spent ten years studying with Chán master Daoguang.

🎓 Explanation

A spring sounded choked, running down steep rocks,
The green pines chilled the sunlight's coloured rays.

🎉 Appreciation

The poet uses inverted lines to highlight the sound of the spring in the ear and the color of the sun in the eye, and to write about the quiet and cold scenery.

夜歸

Because this poem has not been translated into English, only Chinese and Pinyin are shown. If you know the English translation of this poem, please leave a comment below, or go to quora to answer
Because this poem has not been translated into English, only Chinese and Pinyin are shown. If you know the English translation of this poem, please leave a comment below, or go to quora to answer

夜深歸客依筇行,冷燐依螢聚土塍。 村店月昏泥徑滑,竹窗斜漏補衣燈。

Pinyin: Yè gūi
yè shēn guī kè yī qióng xíng, lěng lín yī yíng jù tǔ chéng.
Cūn diàn yuè hūn ní jìng huá, zhú chuāng xié lòu bǔ yī dēng.
Pinyin: Yè gūi yè shēn guī kè yī qióng xíng, lěng lín yī yíng jù tǔ chéng. Cūn diàn yuè hūn ní jìng huá, zhú chuāng xié lòu bǔ yī dēng.

😎 People

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The portrait is beautified by AI after the original photo processing
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There is very little information about this poet, so please feel free to add it in the comments at the bottom of the page if you know anything about it.
There is very little information about this poet, so please feel free to add it in the comments at the bottom of the page if you know anything about it.
Zhou Mi (1232-1298), a native of late Song and early Yuan dynasties, was known as GongJing. He wrote books such as "Qi Dong Ye Yu".
Translation When it was dark at night, I had to walk with a bamboo cane, but it was good that there were phosphorus fires and fireflies on the ridge of the field, emitting a faint light, so that people could pass smoothly. When we reached the village store, it was very difficult to walk because of the moonlight and the slippery mud road, but it was good that the light from the bamboo window of the village store shone to help people continue to walk.
Commentary 筇 Uribe (qióng): A kind of bamboo. It has a solid heart and high joints, and is suitable for use as a walking stick. Here it refers to a walking stick. 土(tǔ)塍 (chéng): an earth ridge in the field

🎉 Appreciation

This poem uses the phrase "夜(yè)歸(gūi)" to cover the whole piece, so you should grasp that the season is "night" and the event is "returning". The poem is about "night" and "return", so we need to find the imagery in "night" and the mood in "return". Since it is already "late at night" and we have to return home, it is not necessary to say that we are homesick for our hometown; "竹(zhú)窗(chuāng)斜(xié)漏(lòu)補(bǔ)衣(yī)燈(dēng)", which is what the wanderer (the night person) sees when he is almost at home, it is already late at night and the "補(bǔ)衣(yī)燈(dēng)" is still on at home, which shows the concern and nostalgia of the family for the traveler.
The opening lines of the poem, "夜(yè)深(shēn)歸(gūi)客(kè)", clarify the title of the poem, "夜(yè)歸(gūi)". Why do we have to rush back overnight? There is no explanation in the poem, but in the following lines, the reader can imagine that it is about a long-lost wanderer who is so homesick for his family that when he reaches the last stage of his journey, he does not want to spend another night at the lodging, but prefers to travel day and night in the dark, so that he arrives home late at night. The poem captures the scene when he is about to arrive. The three words "依(yī)筇(qióng)行(xíng)" paint a picture of the returning guest. Through the figure of the returnee hobbling with his staff, one can imagine the difficulty of traveling late at night, and one can also infer the tiredness of the traveler and his feelings of being close to his hometown.
The second line seems to be about the scene of walking through the wilderness outside the village: on the earthen ridges in the fields, there are ghostly fires and glowing fireflies. The cold and shimmering environment of the deserted paths at night brings out the desolation of the lonely night walk of the returnee, and also contrasts the eagerness of the returnee to return home despite everything. The colder it is on the way, the more eager one is to return to the warmth of home.
The third line is about finally entering the village and seeing the village store first. Under the dim moonlight, the village store looks silent and indifferent, but in the eyes of the returnees, the village store brings life to the wilderness at night, and a sense of closeness to home is born. If you turn around the village store, you will be home soon, right? The three words "泥(ní)徑(jìng)滑(huá)" are precisely about the return of the guest's feet to speed up the pace, and therefore feel more slippery road difficult to travel. He hurriedly turned around the village store in this slippery step, and walked closer and closer to his long-awaited home.
As the picture extends, a picture full of affection is shown to the returning guest - "竹(zhú)窗(chuāng)斜(xié)漏(lòu)補(bǔ)衣(yī)燈(dēng)". How surprising it is! It was so late at night that it was dark all around, the whole village was asleep, but only the bamboo window of his own house still showed the light, and the figure mending clothes under the lamp was vaguely visible. Ah, that is not what he misses, warm home? At this moment, the familiar figure is strongly knocking at the heart of the returning guest.

竹窗聞風寄苗發司空曙

Because this poem has not been translated into English, only Chinese and Pinyin are shown. If you know the English translation of this poem, please leave a comment below, or go to quora to answer
Because this poem has not been translated into English, only Chinese and Pinyin are shown. If you know the English translation of this poem, please leave a comment below, or go to quora to answer

微風驚暮坐,臨牖思悠哉。 開門複動竹,疑是故人來。 時滴枝上露,稍沾階下苔。 何當一入幌,為拂綠琴埃。

Pinyin: zhú chuāng wén fēng jì miáo fā sī kōng shǔ
wéi fēng jīng mù zuò, lín yǒu sī yōu zāi.
kāi mén fù dòng zhú, yí shì gùrén lái.
shí dī zhī shàng lù, shāo zhān jiē xià tái.
hé dāng yī rù huǎng, wèi fú lǜ qín āi.
Pinyin: zhú chuāng wén fēng jì miáo fā sī kōng shǔ wéi fēng jīng mù zuò, lín yǒu sī yōu zāi. kāi mén fù dòng zhú, yí shì gùrén lái. shí dī zhī shàng lù, shāo zhān jiē xià tái. hé dāng yī rù huǎng, wèi fú lǜ qín āi.
😼 This audio file can help you practice your pronunciation

😎 People

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The portrait is beautified by AI after the original photo processing
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Li Yi (Chinese: 李益; pinyinLǐ YìWade–GilesLi I, about 746/748–827/829) was a poet of the Tang Dynasty.
Three of Li Yi's poems were collected in the popular anthology Three Hundred Tang Poems. However, one of his most famous poems and one which was included in most other Classical Chinese poetry anthologies was not included in the Tang 300[1] namely the one translated by Herbert Giles as "A cast-off favourite", written in the persona of a palace lady.
Translation Sitting alone in the evening, I was startled by the sound of the breeze, and my thoughts drifted far away from the sky as I meditated by the window. The breeze blew open the courtyard door and blew the bamboo bush, making people suspect that it was the arrival of an old friend. The dew on the branches and leaves drips down from time to time due to the wind, gradually moistening the dark moss under the steps. When will the wind lift the curtains and enter the house to wipe away the dust that has accumulated on the green piano for me.
Commentary 苗發、司空曙 Miao Fa and Sikong Shu: poets of the Tang Dynasty, poet friends of Li Yi, both ranked among the "Ten Talents of the Dali". 臨(lín)牖 (yǒu): near the window. 故(gù)人(rén): Old friends. 苔(tái): moss. 何(hé)當(dāng): when. 幌 (huǎng): mantle, curtain

🎉 Appreciation

The title of the poem is "竹(zhú)窗(chuāng)聞(wén)風(fēng)寄(jì)苗(miáo)發(fā)司(sī)空(kōng)曙(shǔ)", and the most active image in the poem is the sudden breeze in the evening. "望(wàng)風(fēng)懷(huái)想(xiǎng),能(néng)不(bù)依(yī)依(yī)" (Li Ling, "Reply to Su Wu"). The wind is a common simile used by the ancients to express nostalgia and longing. "時(shí)因(yīn)北(běi)風(fēng),复(fù)惠(huì)德(dé)音(yīn)" shows the nostalgia for the old friend, and "故(gù)馬(mǎ)依(yī)北(běi)風(fēng),越(yuè)鳥(niǎo)巢(cháo)南(nán)枝(zhī)" is also the nostalgia for the old garden. In addition, the wind is often used to symbolize beauty and nobility. Mencius said, "The virtue of a gentleman is the wind." It is an ancient tradition to think of the deceased because of the wind and to use the wind to send one's thoughts. This poem is no different. The breeze is the catalyst for the poet's thoughts, the trust for the hope of meeting the deceased, and the clue for the structure of the poem.
The poem is inspired by "望(wàng)風(fēng)懷(huái)想(xiǎng)", so it starts with the sudden arrival of the breeze. In the evening, the poet was sitting alone in his room, meditating on the window. Suddenly, a sound startled him, and it turned out to be the breeze blowing. The poet feels extraordinarily lonely and lonely, and his longing for friendship is suddenly aroused, hoping for the arrival of the deceased. He listened carefully as the breeze blew open the door of the courtyard, gently blowing the bamboo bush, moving freely and in a familiar environment, as if it was really his old friend who had come in his mind. However, this is, after all, an illusion, "疑(yí)是(shì) suspected to be" only. I did not realize that it was already night, the breeze swept through the bamboo, dew drops on the branches and leaves from time to time, the long-untracked stone steps have long been trailing moss, dripping dew has gradually moistened the moss color. This is an incomparably quiet and serene realm, incomparably deep loneliness and thoughts. Unfortunately, the wind is too small to lift the curtain into the house. On the green piano, which had not been played for a long time, dust had accumulated like dirt. The poet says: "When will the wind brush the dust off the lyre for me? The concluding lines are subtle and meaningful. The meaning of the ending line is: Without Zhong Ziqi, Bo Ya has no intention to play the lute. When the old man can really lift the curtain and enter the house like the wind, I will reorganize the silk strings and play the green zither to console my soulmate. The word "何(hé)當(dāng) when" shows that the poet is still sitting alone in the room, but also reveals his complaint and longing, which is a double reference to the wind and the deceased person, and concludes the theme of sending thoughts.
The whole piece is based on the artistic concept of the word "聞(wén)風(fēng) hearing the wind". The first part of the piece is about thinking of friends in the wind, and hearing the wind and wondering about coming. The two lines "時(shí)滴(dī)" are a pair of flowing water, the wind blowing the leaves and the dew dropping on the moss, the intention is still to write about the wind. The wind is also a romantic reverie. The dust on the green piano is due to the loneliness and lack of thoughts, so I hope that the wind will come and brush away the dust and reorganize the silk strings to send my thoughts to my friends. In the poem, the breeze in the evening is a real scene, and "疑(yí)是(shì)故(gù)人(rén)" is a reverie; one real and one imaginary, suspected to be in a trance; one main and one auxiliary, intertwined to write, and the sound is subtle and fascinating. The wind is a "微(wēi)", the self is a "驚(jīng) shock", "疑(yí) suspicion", and the deceased is a "悠(yōu)思(sī)". ". The poem is a series of subtle inner emotional activities, which rise with the wind and progress with the wind, interplaying with each other and vividly. The whole poem is cleverly conceived, metaphorical and meticulous in description. It can be said that the artistic charm of this poem does not lie in moving people with emotions, but in winning with ingenuity and making people admire with talent. There are nine verbs in the poem, either directly about the movement of the wind or because of it, such as: startle, think, open, move, suspect, drip, dip, enter, and brush. However, all of them are based on the dark line of "寄(jì)(思(sī))", like the shadow of a shadow, closely connected. This is where the poet's craftsmanship lies, and it is also one of the important reasons for the great artistic charm of this poem.

雁引愁心去,山銜好月來

Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Translated as: geese crying farewell to the river as they flew south; evening falling as if mountain tops put up the moon with their lips
Translated as: geese crying farewell to the river as they flew south; evening falling as if mountain tops put up the moon with their lips
😼 This audio file can help you practice your pronunciation

✨ Introduction

From "Going Up Yoyang Tower with a Friend" by Li Bai of the Tang Dynasty

😎 People

Li Bai (Chinese: 李白; pinyinLǐ Bái, 701–762), also known as Li Bocourtesy name Taibai (Chinese: 太白), was a Chinese poet, acclaimed from his own time to the present as a brilliant and romantic figure who took traditional poetic forms to new heights. He and his friend Du Fu (712–770) were two of the most prominent figures in the flourishing of Chinese poetry in the Tang dynasty, which is often called the "Golden Age of Chinese Poetry". The expression "Three Wonders" denotes Li Bai's poetry, Pei Min's swordplay, and Zhang Xu's calligraphy.[1]
Around 1000 poems attributed to Li are extant. His poems have been collected into the most important Tang dynasty poetry, Heyaue yingling ji[2] compiled in 753 by Yin Fan. Thirty-four of Li Bai’s poems are included in the anthology Three Hundred Tang Poems, which was first published in the 18th century.[3] Around the same time, translations of his poems began to appear in Europe. The poems were models for celebrating the pleasures of friendship, the depth of nature, solitude, and the joys of drinking wine. Among the most famous are "Waking from Drunkenness on a Spring Day", "The Hard Road to Shu", and "Quiet Night Thought", which are still taught in schoolbooks in China. In the West, multilingual translations of Li's poems continue to be made. His life has even taken on a legendary aspect, including tales of drunkenness, chivalry, and the well-known tale that Li drowned when he reached from his boat to grasp the moon's reflection in the river while drunk.
Much of Li's life is reflected in his poetry, the poems are about places he visited, friends whom he saw off on journeys to distant locations perhaps never to meet again, his own dream-like imaginations embroidered with shamanic overtones, current events of which he had news, descriptions taken from nature in a timeless moment of poetry, and so on. However, of particular importance are the changes in the times through which he lived. His early poetry took place in the context of a "golden age" of internal peace and prosperity in the Tang dynasty, under the reign of an emperor who actively promoted and participated in the arts. This ended with the beginning with the rebellion of general An Lushan. His rebellion lead most of Northern China to be devastated by war and famine. Li's poetry during this period has taken new tones and qualities. Unlike his younger friend Du Fu, Li did not live to see the end of the chaos. However, much of Li's poetry has survived, retaining enduring popularity in mainland China and Taiwan. Li Bai is depicted in the Wu Shuang Pu (無雙譜, Table of Peerless Heroes) by Jin Guliang.

🎓 Explanation

The geese flying south took away my sadness and boredom, and the distant mountain peaks brought a beautiful moon.

🎉 Appreciation

Li Bai was in a pardoned mood at this time, and the scene in front of him also seemed to be affectionate, sharing the joy and happiness with the poet: "geese crying farewell to the river as they flew south; evening falling as if mountain tops put up the moon with their lips." The geese fly high, taking away the poet's sorrowful and bitter heart; the moon comes out of the mountain pass, as if the moon of reunion and beauty has come from Mount Jun. The poem "geese crying farewell to the river as they flew south" is written in "Wenyuan Yinghua" as "The geese leave the autumn river to go". The latter is only about the geese indifferently parting from the river and flying away, lacking emotion, far less than the former, which uses anthropomorphism to write that the geese understand human feelings and take away the sorrowful hearts, and contrasts with the next line of Junshan's intention to "evening falling as if mountain tops put up the moon with their lips.", thus making the image seem lively and interesting. The phrase "evening falling as if mountain tops put up the moon with their lips." is original and original in imagination, with the word "銜(xián)" and the realm is all out, written in a sly and witty way.

遠書歸夢兩悠悠,只有空床敵素秋

Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Translated as:
Translated as:
Distant letters, dreams of returning Both are few and far away.
All I have: an empty bed Set against a pale autumn.
😼 This audio file can help you practice your pronunciation

✨ Introduction

From "Retirement" by Li Shangyin of the Tang Dynasty

😎 People

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The portrait is beautified by AI after the original photo processing
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Li Shangyin (Chinese: 李商隱; pinyinLǐ Shāngyǐn, c. 813–858), courtesy name Yishan (Chinese: 義山), was a Chinese poet and politician of the late Tang dynasty, born in the Henei Commandery (now QinyangHenan). He is noted for the imagist quality of his poems and his "no title" (Chinese: 無題; pinyinwútí) style of poetry. Li Shangyin has been frequently anthologized, and many of his poems have been translated into various languages, including several collections in English.

🎓 Explanation

I was looking forward to a letter from my beloved wife from afar, looking for a dream to return to comfort, and woke up in the middle of the night, and suddenly realized that it had been several years since I left, and only the empty bed and the silent and cold Suqiu silently facing each other.

🎉 Appreciation

It has been a long time since the poet left his hometown and relatives far away. The letter from his wife from a distant place is a comfort for the lonely life in a foreign country, but it has been a long time since I have seen any trace of it. In this lonely autumn night, the feeling of emptiness of not hearing from my family became so strong that my soul, gnawed by loneliness, naturally wanted to seek solace from "dreams of returning". Even if it is a short dream reunion, it can always comfort the longing for each other. But "路(lù)迢(tiáo)歸(guī)夢(mèng)難(nán)成(chéng)" (Li Yu's "Serenade of Peaceful Joy"), and when they wake up, they have been apart for years, and their souls have never entered their dreams. "Distant letters, dreams of returning Both are few and far away. The word "few and far away" not only graphically shows the long distance between the distant book and the returning dream, but also evocatively expresses the disappointment of the poet when both hopes are unfulfilled. The two sides are separated by mountains and rivers, and the time and space that separates them after years of parting is also hidden beyond the words.
The next line is about the lonely and cold feeling after waking up in the middle of the night. The word "Set against" not only highlights the silent and cold atmosphere of "empty bed" and "a pale autumn", but also shows that the person sleeping alone in an empty bed cannot bear the cold and desolate situation of "a pale autumn". It expresses the unspeakable pathos. a pale autumn is a synonym for autumn. But it is quite rich in suggestive colors. It reminds people of the white and cold autumn frost, the bright and cold autumn moon, the clear and cold autumn water, and all the autumn scenes emitting a sluggish and cold atmosphere.

最喜小兒亡賴,溪頭臥剝蓮蓬

Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Fortunately, this verse is available in translation on the web
Translated as: My favorite little son is mischievous.                        He's lying beside brook peeling lotus pods.
Translated as: My favorite little son is mischievous. He's lying beside brook peeling lotus pods.
😼 This audio file can help you practice your pronunciation

✨ Introduction

From "Qingpingle Theme: Happy Rural Living" by Xin Qiji of the Song Dynasty

😎 People

The portrait is beautified by AI after the original photo processing
The portrait is beautified by AI after the original photo processing
notion image
notion image
Xin Qiji (28 May 1140 – 3 Oct 1207) was a Chinese calligrapher, military general, and poet during the Southern Song dynasty (1127–1279).

🎓 Explanation

Most of all, I love the naughty little son who is lying across the grass at the head of the stream, peeling the freshly picked lotus seeds.

🎉 Appreciation

In the next piece, the eldest son takes up the burden of hoeing the bean fields in the east of the stream. The second son is still young and can only do some auxiliary work, so he is weaving a chicken coop at home. The third son is ignorant of the world, and only knows how to play naughtily at will. Look at his attitude when he is lying by the stream and peeling lotus seeds to eat. This shows that most people in the countryside are not idle people who sit around and wait for food and get something for nothing, even children who are not yet adults have to do some work that they can do, so the hard work of adults can be imagined. The word "lying" is indeed the best use of the word, which brings out the innocent, lively and naughty energy of a child lying by the stream and peeling lotus seeds to the paper, thus making the characters distinctive and the mood intriguing. It shows that only the old man and the youngest child, who is not yet in the labor force, enjoy themselves at ease. The author uses a side-stroke counterpoint to reflect a quiet and leisurely side of rural life, but leaves the reader with plenty of room for imagination.
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